Selected favorite photos

These are some of my favorite photos from the JoCoHistory image database. I’ll periodically post groups of these these as I come across them.

This little lady is Beverly Williams, age 3 1/2 years. She was crowned “Little Miss Olathe” on July 29, 1937.

Little Miss Olathe

Little Miss Olathe

Here is a photo of an interesting promotion by the Jennings Mill in Overland Park. The display advertises a new kind of undercoat painting for homes.

Underware [sic] for Houses

Underwear for Houses

This is a dramatic view from 1967 at Kansas School for the Deaf. This old standpipe (A kind of water tower) was being demolished but had to be knocked over before it could be taken apart. This snapshot catches the fall happening.

Standpipe falling

Standpipe falling

This is one of my favorite characters in the history of Johnson County: Buddy the Deaf dog. His owner, Bob Parker made the circuit with Buddy in the 1950s, demonstrating that a deaf dog could be trained to excel in any number of things. In addition to writing letters, Buddy also smoked a pipe, wore hats, and performed a number of physical tricks.

Buddy the Deaf Dog

Buddy the Deaf Dog

This photo below is great simply because of the dichotomy between the faces of the subjects and the message being conveyed.

Season's Greetings

Season's Greetings

This next photo has nothing to do with Johnson County, other than one woman, Mary Emma Bowles later lived in Olathe.

Wellesley Crew Team

Wellesley Crew Team

I like the composition of this next photograph, depicting two players communicating in a huddle. Kansas School for the Deaf is sometimes identified as the birthplace of the football huddle as we know it today.

Football huddle

Football huddle

And here are three very tough looking women.

Three women

Three women

Last but not least, we have this very telling portrait of an unidentified girl.

Portrait of unidentified girl

Portrait of unidentified girl

She does not look thrilled to be in the studio having her portrait taken. I like moments like these that reveal that people 100 years ago had very different lives, but had a lot of the same problems and emotions that we do today.

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