JoCo Street Names: M – Z

This third and last installment will highlight the last remaining road and street names in the alphabet. Thanks again to the Johnson County Museum for providing the research on the background of these names in Johnson County, Kansas. Now when you drive down roads, like Metcalf, Nall and Roe, you will know a little bit more about their history.

Mastin:  J.J. Mastin owned several acres west and south of Merriam where the Mastin subdivision is now located. [Journal Herald. May 13, 1999 p. 7.]

Marty Street: John Marty, vice president of the Overland Park State Bank in 1910. [Overland Park (Kan.). Community Development Dept. Comprehensive Planning Division. (1978). History of Overland Park. Overland Park, KS: City of Overland Park. p. 58.]

Mastin: J.J. Mastin owned several acres west and south of Merriam where the Mastin subdivision is now located. [Journal Herald. May 13, 1999 p. 7.]

Metcalf: Named for a George Metcalf, Oklahoma banker, who bought land for investment purposes and to farm when he retired. Overland Park (Kan.). Community Development Dept. Comprehensive Planning Division. (1978). History of Overland Park. Overland Park, KS: City of Overland Park. p. 58. [see portrait 1997.077.000 in museum collection]

Mission Road: Once named Porter road because it bisected the Porter Farm. [“Historic Johnson County” Johnson County Herald September 3, 1969 p. 7.]

Another possible reason for the name for Mission Road – once called Rock Road, followed the Rock Creek from Westport to the Indian mission. [“Many creeks take names from area’s history, but some are just a mystery.” Johnson County Sun September 1, 1993 p. 5A.]

Nall Avenue: John Nall and his brother purchased school land, then built a home near Nall and 67th. The land was later turned into city lots. [Overland Park (Kan.). Community Development Dept. Comprehensive Planning Division. (1978). History of Overland Park. Overland Park, KS: City of Overland Park. p. 58.]

Nieman Road: Nieman Road was a branch of the Santa Fe Trail. It was named after C. Nieman, cashier of the Shawnee State Bank, which opened in 1908. [Lenexa Historical Society. (1999). Heritage of Lenexa: Historic sites, street names. Lenexa, KS: Lenexa Historical Society. ]

Noland: T.W. Noland was a Johnson County engineer and was in charge of every road build in the county. [Lenexa Historical Society. (1999). Heritage of Lenexa: Historic sites, street names. Lenexa, KS: Lenexa Historical Society. ]

Pawnee Road: Indian name meaning “horn.” [“Historic Johnson County”.  Johnson County Herald September 3, 1969 p. 7.] [note: Pawnee became synonymous with “Indian slave” in general use in Canada, and a slave from any tribe came to be called Panis.–Carter Godwin Woodson, “The Slave in Canada”, The Journal of Negro History, Vol. 5, July 1920, No. 3, pp. 263-264]

Pflumm: Named for C.H. Pflumm, president of Shawnee State Savings Bank in 1958. [Overland Park (Kan.). Community Development Dept. Comprehensive Planning Division. (1978). History of Overland Park. Overland Park, KS: City of Overland Park. p. 58.]

Quivira: Name is indirectly linked to land sought by Coronado in Kansas in the 1880’s and by the name of the Quivira Indians who got their name from the Quivira River where they lived. Quivira was previously named Schlagel Road. The Schlagel family owned large tracts of land in South Overland Park. [Overland Park (Kan.). Community Development Dept. Comprehensive Planning Division. (1978). History of Overland Park. Overland Park, KS: City of Overland Park. p. 59. ]

Reeder: Andrew Reeder was the first territorial governor of Kansas. [Lenexa Historical Society. (1999). Heritage of Lenexa: Historic sites, street names. Lenexa, KS: Lenexa Historical Society. ]

Riley: This street was named for Thomas Riley, vice president and general manager for the Strang Line. [Overland Park (Kan.). Community Development Dept. Comprehensive Planning Division. (1978). History of Overland Park. Overland Park, KS: City of Overland Park. p. 59.]

Roe Avenue: John Roe came to the United States in 1860 from Ireland seeking farmland. [Overland Park (Kan.). Community Development Dept. Comprehensive Planning Division. (1978). History of Overland Park. Overland Park, KS: City of Overland Park. p. 59.]

Roe Avenue and Roe Lane: Named also for John Roe. [“Historic Johnson County” Johnson County Herald. September 3, 1969 p. 7.

Santa Fe Drive: Named for the Santa Fe Trail that follows through Overland Park. [Overland Park (Kan.). Community Development Dept. Comprehensive Planning Division. (1978). History of Overland Park. Overland Park, KS: City of Overland Park. p. 59.]

Slater: Named for Cyprian Slater, one of the earliest residents who served as the first school board treasurer in 1871. [Journal Herald May 13, 1999 p. 7.]

Strang Drive: This street is named after the founder of Overland Park and president of the Strang Interurban Railroad. [Overland Park (Kan.). Community Development Dept. Comprehensive Planning Division. (1978). History of Overland Park. Overland Park, KS: City of Overland Park. p. 59.]

Strang Line: Named after the interurban railroad started by William B. Strang, Jr. (1857-1921). [Lenexa Historical Society. (1999). Heritage of Lenexa: Historic sites, street names. Lenexa, KS: Lenexa Historical Society. ]

Switzer Road: One of the two Breyfogle roads that were in the Shawnee- Overland Park area that were combined and named Switzer. [Overland Park (Kan.). Community Development Dept. Comprehensive Planning Division. (1978). History of Overland Park. Overland Park, KS: City of Overland Park. p. 60.]

Walmer Avenue: Named for Edwin Walmer, assessor for Mission Township from 1927-1955. [Overland Park (Kan.). Community Development Dept. Comprehensive Planning Division. (1978). History of Overland Park. Overland Park, KS: City of Overland Park. p. 60.]

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1 Comment

Filed under Research

One response to “JoCo Street Names: M – Z

  1. bob blackman

    I believe Murlen was named after Murl and Lynn Crump. I believe they owned a dairy at the corner of Santa Fe and Murlen at one time.

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